Maternity Obligations, Paternity Leave, and Adoption Leave Requests for Employers

Do you have a member of staff requesting maternity, paternity, shared parental or adoption leave?  Are you unsure of your obligations and what you must pay?  Have you received a flexible working request from an employee returning from maternity leave?

The rules on parenting and adoption leave are complex and regularly updated.  You will probably have experience of administering maternity pay and leave, but do you know what to do with paternity and adoption leave requests?  Having the right policies in place will make sure you don’t fall foul of the rules, and the right policies can even motivate staff if you are seen as a good employer.

For children born or adopted after 5 April 2015, you may now start to receive requests from employees to take shared parental leave.  These requests could come from both men and women and the leave could be up to a whole year in length.  Shared parental leave is a very complex topic – we can guide you through the detailed rules to help you deal with requests from your employees in the right way.

It is now becoming increasingly common to receive flexible working requests from mothers reaching the end of their maternity leave.  Like many employers you may be happy to give flexibility, but are worried about damaging your business if you give away too much.  The right advice can mean that you keep your staff happy but don’t give away flexibility that you can’t afford.

At Backhouse Solicitors we are experts on the parental leave rules.  We can prepare your policies for you, talk you through each new leave application and help you respond to requests for flexible working.

The benefits for your business:

  • Up to date policies will keep you on the right side of the law and save you time answering questions from staff
  • Our advice on flexible working requests will stop you giving away flexibility that you can’t afford

Don’t let the parental leave rules become a burden – contact us now on 01245 893400 or email [email protected] to speak to one of our expert employment law solicitors.